Quote of the day for December 5th

Men really do need sea-monsters in their personal oceans 


~John Steinbeck

On December 5, 1941, John Steinbeck’s nonfiction book, The Sea of Cortez: A Leisurely Journal of Travel and Research, was published. Co-authored by Steinbeck and marine biologist Ed Ricketts, the work was written shortly after the pair’s voyage to the Gulf of California to study aquatic life. In 1951 it was republished as The Log from the Sea of Cortez. Ricketts was the inspiration for the character Doc in Steinbeck’s Cannery Row.

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Quote of the Day for November 26th

I’m fascinated with the stories that we tell. Real histories become fantasies and fairy tales, morality tales and fables. 


~Kara Walker



Kara Walker (born November 26, 1969) is a MacArthur “genius grant” winner and artist who’s become internationally known for using black cut-paper silhouettes to portray the African American experience in the antebellum South. Among the books containing her work and comments are Kara Walker: Pictures from Another Time, Kara Walker: Narratives of a Negress, and After the Deluge.

Quote of the day for Veterans Day

Let’s take a moment to Remember, Appreciate, and Thank All of our Men and Women who have Served in the Armed Forces so We can Have and Hold Dear the Freedoms we Enjoy. 

The nicest veterans…the kindest and funniest ones, the ones who hated war the most, were the ones who’d really fought. 

~Kurt Vonnegut

It’s Veterans Day and Kurt Vonnegut’s birthday. The bestselling author of Slaughterhouse-Five (born November 11, 1922) drew on his experiences during World War II to craft his satirical antiwar novel. He had been captured by the Germans and survived the firebombing of Dresden—an event that appears in the book. Among his other popular works are Cat’s Cradle, Breakfast of Champions, and God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater.

Happy Saturday! Here’s a great quote to start the weekend off…

  

Heaven would never be heaven without you. 


~Richard Matheson

Love reading about worldwide apocalypses and infectious diseases? Then thank Richard Matheson. The science fiction and horror writer (born February 20, 1926) is credited with popularizing the concept with the publication of his influential—and repeatedly adapted—novel, I Am Legend.

Tudor Tidbits

Because I love British history, especially Arthurian and Tudor, here’s some Tudor tidbits of what happened today in 1491…
 

On This Day 6th December 1491

On 6th December 1491 fourteen year old Anne, Duchess of Brittany, was married to Charles VIII of France in completion of the Treaty of Vergers. Anne had inherited the duchy from her father, Francois II, who had spent the greater part of his life trying to protect the independence of Brittany from a France newly resurgent after the misery and costs of the Hundred Years War began to recede. The Regent of France, Anne of Beaujeu, had pursued the policy of her father, Louis XI, to surround and incorporate the various independent fiefs surrounding France and control the mighty feudal princes who still controlled large territories, outside crown control. Brittany became involved in internal French struggles,known as the ‘Mad War’ and following defeat in battle in 1488, Francis had been obliged to submit to France as a vassal. Before his death, Francis had tried to arrange for Anne to marry Maximilian, King of the Romans (later Emperor), and a betrothal had taken place. However, Francis died before the marriage could be completed and the French claimed the right to act as Anne’s feudal overlords. The marriage to Maximilian was annulled and Charles, who was twenty-one, became her husband. The marriage was not happy, and produced no children. Charles died in 1498 after hitting his head on a door, and was succeeded by his cousin Louis d’Orleans, as both king and husband.
For more nuggets of knowledge about King Henry VIII and the Tudor Dynasty please visit my other site Tudor Time at http://TudorTime.org
All My Best, 

Jill M Roberts 

On this day…

  

On This Day 28th August 1595

On 28th August 1595, Sir Francis Drake and Sir John Hawkins departed England on what was to prove their final voyage. Whilst the Spanish Armada of 1588 had been defeated, this by no means meant that the power of Spain was overcome, and throughout the 1590s there had been further low-level warfare. One of the tactics employed was the capturing of the Spanish ships, returning from the West Indies, laden with the silver and other precious items found there. This had the added advantage of enriching the Queen (who was desperately short of cash to pay for armies) and the captains themselves. On this particular occasion, they headed for San Juan, in Puerto Rico, but, despite two attempts, failed to capture the port. Both Drake and Hawkins fell ill during the voyage, dying and being buried at sea.

Quote of the Day!

  

Sleep is good, he said, and books are better. 

~George R.R. Martin

August 6, 1996: A Game of Thrones was first published 19 years ago today. George R.R. Martin wrote the landmark fantasy novel (as well as its sequels) on a thirty-year-old PC using a rather ancient WordStar 4.0 word processor. He owns a separate computer for checking his email.

Quote of the Day for Tuesday!

  

There is something delicious about writing the first words of a story. You never quite know where they’ll take you. 

Beatrix Potter

Beatrix Potter (born July 28, 1866), author of the beloved Peter Rabbit books, showed an early interest in animals. As a child, she and her younger brother took care of mice, rabbits, a hedgehog, bats, butterflies, and insects.